Apples: The Colors of Fall

EVEN BEFORE the leaves turn color, there is every imaginable shade in New England’s apple orchards.

Click on the apple’s name to learn more about it, including where it is grown.

Empire apples (1945) are sweeter and denser than McIntosh and more flavorful than Red Delicious, its two parents. Scott Farm Orchard, Dummerston, Vermont. (Russell Steven Powell)
Golden Delicious are harvested in mid- to late October. High Hill Orchard, Meriden, Connecticut. (Russell Steven Powell)
Golden Delicious (1890) are good for fresh eating and excellent in pies. Bishop’s Orchards, Guilford, Connecticut. (Russell Steven Powell)
Russeting occurs naturally on a number of varieties, particularly around the stem, while completely covering some like Zabergau Reinette (1885) with a lightly textured, copper-colored skin. Despite their modest appearance, russets are known for outstanding flavor and excellence in ciders. Scott Farm Orchard, Dummerston, Vermont. (Russell Steven Powell)
Jonagold (1943) is one of the best late-season apples, with more apple flavor than Honeycrisp but a similar, explosive crunch. High Hill Orchard, Meriden, Connecticut. (Russell Steven Powell)
Esopus Spitzenburg (1700s) is good when picked, better in storage. Esopus Spitzenburg’s strawberry-like appearance results from its prominent yellow pores, called lenticels, on its crimson skin. Store some in your refrigerator for a few weeks while they gain flavor (always keep your apples cold to keep them crisp). Scott Farm Orchard, Dummerston, Vermont. (Russell Steven Powell)
Idared (1935) is another variety that is good when fresh picked but better in storage, developing a complex, spicy flavor that is coveted for pies and cider. Bishop’s Orchards, Guilford, Connecticut. (Russell Steven Powell)
A tree loaded with Winesaps (1700s), a small apple with flavor as bright as its cherry red skin. Scott Farm Orchard, Dummerston, Vermont. (Russell Steven Powell)
New England-grown Fuji (1930) are sweet, juicy, and the freshest you can buy. Bishop’s Orchards, Guilford, Connecticut. (Russell Steven Powell)
Monroe’s (1910) flavor is more sweet than tart. Good eaten fresh and in ciders, it stores well, and is a beautiful red color. High Hill Orchard, Meriden, Connecticut. (Russell Steven Powell)
Karmijn de Sonnaville (1949), a rare but stunning apple from the Netherlands with flavor to match. Scott Farm Orchard, Dummerston, Vermont. (Russell Steven Powell)

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